Category Archives: Media

Read our new Debate on the Contested Provisioning of Care & Housing

New Debate!

the Contested Provisioning of Care & Housing

15th of September, 2022

Andreas Novy & Brigitte Aulenbacher

The Austrian Academy of Science has funded a three year research project coordinated by Johannes-Kepler University Linz and Vienna University of Economics and Business on “The Contested Provisioning of Care and Housing” (www.contestedcareandhousing.com). The project, which finances four PhD-students, investigates current transformations of care and housing provision by drawing on insights from Karl Polanyi. Care and housing are undergoing profound changes in contemporary market societies: on the one hand, we are witnessing a market shift towards enforced commodification of care and housing, on the other hand, there is a community shift potentially going along with their decommodification. Both, market- and community-based forms of care and housing provision are embedded in relations of dominance and inequality and are thus contested. In this context, the IKPS has organized a debate on the “Contested Provisioning of Care and Housing”. It invited contributions shedding light on the contestation of care and housing provision by drawing on Polanyi’s core concepts:

(1) his substantive understanding of the economy, defined broadly as the organization of livelihoods,
(2) his four economic principles of (market) exchange, reciprocity, redistribution and householding,
(3) his concept of fictitious commodities and the related research on the commodification of goods (like housing) and services (like care) which have not been produced for exchange on markets and
(4) his analysis of a double movement of marketization (movement) and social protection (countermovement) that characterizes market societies. The contributions to this debate ideally try to discuss some of the following questions:

  • What are commonalities and particularities of care and housing provision/regimes in different countries? How can Polanyian concepts enrich such (regime) analyses?
  • What are commonalities and particularities of double movements, of marketization and social protection in care and housing?
  • How does the sector-specific composition of the principles of economic behavior and dynamics of the double movement impact relations of dominance and inequality as well as their contestation in the field of care and housing?

The debate strived to bring together experts from both research areas, to exchange and advance perspectives on care and housing and, moreover, to discuss how Polanyi’s work can inspire the investigation of their contested societal provisioning.

Benjamin Baumgartner

Valentin Fröhlich

Florian Pimminger

Hans Volmary

Read the essays on the Contested Provisioning of Care and Housing here: 

Invitation to our Fall Webinar Series

Fall 22 Webinar Series

Shaping provisioning systems for social-ecological transformation

We are delighted to inform you of our upcoming Fall 22 webinar series on “Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation” after our sucessful  Deglobalization & Social-Ecological Transformation  series.

31st July, 2022

Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation Webinar Series

In light of accelerating social-ecological crises, the IPCC report calls for “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society to limit global warming to 1.5 degree Celsius”. How can such an unprecedented transformation take place? Climate research has increasingly highlighted the insufficiency of individual behavioral changes (e.g. green consumerism), shifting the attention to the framework conditions – so-called provisioning systems (e.g. those for energy, food, or mobility) – that enable and constrain individual behavior. Provisioning systems, including elements such as infrastructures and diverse regulations, structure how everyday life can be lived, thereby establishing the conditions of possibility for climate-friendly living. While it is desirable to behave responsibly within existing framework conditions, it is much more important that more and more actors work together to change them. Thus, the key challenge of a social-ecological transformation consists in shaping provisioning systems collectively in a coordinated and goal-oriented way. This webinar series, consisting of three webinars, addresses this challenge from various angles. 

Dates
October 4th 2022, 6:30 pm (CET)
A match made in heaven? Synergies between ecological and social provisioning outcomes

October 18th 2022, 6:30 pm (CET)
My good life without me? Potentials and obstacles in democratizing provision systems for a social-ecological transformation

November 8th 2022, 6:30 pm (CET)
Transformation, here and now? Intervention strategies for a social-ecological transformation in diverse provisioning systems

Facilitators: Colleen Schneider, Richard Bärnthaler, Andreas Novy.

Organized by:
Institute for Multilevel-Governance and Development (WU Vienna);
Institute for Ecological Economics (WU Vienna);
International Karl Polanyi Society

In cooperation with Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, Brussels 

 

Find out more about our Webinar Series

Meeting-ID: 917 1394 9872
Zoom Code: 178033

Meeting-ID: 912 8678 2433
Zoom Code: 870479

Meeting-ID: 930 5273 9179
Zoom Code: 858852

More ‘News’: 

We invite you to dive deeper with us into the topic of “provisioning” with the fields of care & housing
We are delighted to invite you to our New Webinar Series on “Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation”
Einstieg in das Leben und Werk Karl Polanyi’s – die Vorträge als Videos
Einladung zu unserer Ausstellungs-Finissage
Join us for the public lecture by our third Vienna Karl Polanyi Visiting Professor Ayşe Buğra on May 17th @7pm
In Vienna for the first time! From May 4th to June 21st at the Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien!
Andreas Novy in INTERNATIONAL – der Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik zu Freiheitsverständnissen in der Pandemiepolitik.
Interview with IKPS Vice-President Dr. Brigitte Aulenbacher on the topic of “The Great Transformation” for CAOÖ Podcast. 20th of September.
Zhang Runkun on the Importance of Polanyi’s work in China. 31st of May.

Vorträge zur Ausstellung zum “Nachsehen”

Vorträge zur Ausstellung zum "Nachsehen"

Polanyi zum kennenlernen

Unsere Ausstellung “Karl Polanyi – Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft” ist ein hoch informativer, dichter Beitrag zu unserer Aufgabe das Werk dieses großen Denkers zu vermitteln. Die Vorträge zu seiner Zeit in Wien und dem Konzept der Ausstellung dienen als hervorragender Einstieg in seine Biografie.

10th May, 2022

Die Vorträge als Einstieg ins Werk Polanyi’s

Am 3.Mai 2022 fand die feierliche Eröffnung der Ausstellung “Karl Polanyi – Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft” im österreichischen Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum in Wien statt.

Die von der International Karl Polanyi Society publizierte Ausstellung zum Leben und Wirken Karl Polanyis war damit zum ersten Mal in Wien zu sehen. Besucher_Innen bekamen Einblick in Polanyis Werk durch informative Vorträge von Expert_Innen wie Brigitte Aulenbacher und Claus Thomasberger.

Eröffnung durch Harald Lindenhofer vom Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien

Begrüßung durch Andreas Novy

Claus Thomasberger “Karl Polanyi und das rote Wien”
Karl Polanyi und das Rote Wien – eine vielschichtige Beziehung: 1886 in Wien geboren, kam Polanyi im Jahr 1919 – schwerkrank und durch eine Kriegsverletzung geschwächt – in die Stadt zurück. Hier traf er seine spätere Frau. Hier wurde seine Tochter geboren. In Wien arbeitete er bis 1933, als er sich aus politischen Gründen zur Emigration gezwungen sah, als Redakteur des „Österreichischen Volkswirts“, der damals wichtigsten mitteleuropäischen Wirtschafts- und Finanzwochenzeitung. Gleichzeitig beteiligte er sich an der Debatte über die sozialistische Rechnungslegung, die von Ludwig von Mises, dem in den 1920er Jahren führenden Vertreter der Schule der Österreichischen Schule der Volkswirtschaftslehre, initiiert worden war, wie auch an den Strategiediskussionen, die am Rande des Austromarxismus geführt wurden. In Wien verbrachte Polanyi die prägenden Jahre seines Lebens. Der Vortrag zeichnet in wenigen Strichen nach, wie sich Polanyis Erfahrungen im Roten Wien in seinen späteren Werken, die ihn zu einem der bedeutendsten Sozialwissenschaftler des 20. Jahrhunderts werden ließen, niederschlugen.

Maria Markantonatou “Understanding the Covid pandemic – Inspired by Karl Polanyi”
To cope with the effects of the lockdowns and to try to return to “normality”, governments around the world, and even self-portrayed neoliberal ones, resorted to massive spending and the breaking of pre-pandemic fiscal orthodoxies. Thus, a current understanding of the pandemic management is that “The state is back. Long live globalization”, that states have “a choice between authoritarian nationalism and an open global order” and that “the return of government” ends an era “in which power and responsibility migrated from states to markets”. Is this the case? Does the rise of authoritarian nationalism conflict with the neoliberal globalization of the past decades? Karl Polanyi stressed that the self-regulating market system was not established spontaneously, and the state intervened to assist the maintenance of the market and correct the effects of crises borne by capitalist dynamics. What does this tell us about today’s state interventions implemented to correct the pandemic crisis effects? Do they restore or challenge the pre-pandemic economic governance?


Brigitte Aulenbacher “Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft: Das Ausstellungskonzept”
Wie ein roter Faden zieht sich die hochaktuelle Frage, wie die Menschheit die industrielle Zivilisation überleben kann, durch Karl Polanyis Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte des Kapitalismus hindurch, in der er das Verhältnis von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft und die Herausbidlung der “Marktgesellschaft” wie des “Maschinenzeitalters” thematisiert. Als scharfsichtiger Kritiker des Wirtschaftsliberalismus zeigt er, wie die ökologischen und sozialen Lebensgrundlagen zerstört werden, wenn Märkte der Gesellschaft den Takt vorgeben und Natur, Arbeit und Geld wie Waren gehandelt werden, und wie die Gesellschaft sich zu schützen sucht. Der Vortrag arbeitet heraus, wie seine Denkfiguren dazu beitragen können, die Transformation des Gegenwartskapitalismus zu verstehen, und seine demokratisch-ökosozialistische Vision einer freien und gerechten Gesellschaft die Suche nach Wegen in eine post-kapitalistische Zukunft anregen kann.

Die Vorträge der Aussellungs-Eröffnung jetzt zum "Nachsehen" auf unserem YouTube-Kanal

So viele spannende Vorträge, so oft gleichzeitig, Lebensbedingungen, die nicht mit Abendveranstaltungen oder den Veranstaltungsorten zusammengehen - wir fördern Bildung in Eigenregie - wann Sie wollen und wo Sie wollen - Wir wollen zur proaktiven Lebensführung beitragen und die Möglichkeit geben, dass unsere Inhalte auch abseits der physischen Veranstaltungen zugänglich sind.

More ‘News’: 

We invite you to dive deeper with us into the topic of “provisioning” with the fields of care & housing
We are delighted to invite you to our New Webinar Series on “Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation”
Einstieg in das Leben und Werk Karl Polanyi’s – die Vorträge als Videos
Einladung zu unserer Ausstellungs-Finissage
Join us for the public lecture by our third Vienna Karl Polanyi Visiting Professor Ayşe Buğra on May 17th @7pm
In Vienna for the first time! From May 4th to June 21st at the Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien!
Andreas Novy in INTERNATIONAL – der Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik zu Freiheitsverständnissen in der Pandemiepolitik.
Interview with IKPS Vice-President Dr. Brigitte Aulenbacher on the topic of “The Great Transformation” for CAOÖ Podcast. 20th of September.
Zhang Runkun on the Importance of Polanyi’s work in China. 31st of May.

Finissage im Wirtschaftsmuseum

Events

fINISSAGE & SOMMERPARTY IM WIRTSCHAFTSMUSEUM

Nach einer erfolgreichen ersten Schau der IKPS Ausstellung “Karl Polanyi – Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft”, freuen wir uns auf die Finissage und gleichzeitige Sommerparty  im Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien.

10th June, 2022

Einladung zur Finissage
Im Rahmen einer kleinen aber feinen Abschlussveranstaltung laden wir unsere Mitglieder und Interessierte am Dienstag, den 21. Juni 2022 um 18:30 zum gemeinsamen Closing der Ausstellung im Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien in der Vogelsanggasse 36, 1050 Wien.

Programm:
Eröffnung & Moderation: Brigitte Aulenbacher (JKU/IKPS)

Keynotes:

Brigitte Aulenbacher (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, IKPS)
Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft: Das Ausstellungskonzept

Wie ein roter Faden zieht sich die hochaktuelle Frage, wie die Menschheit die industrielle Zivilisation überleben kann, durch Karl Polanyis Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte des Kapitalismus hindurch, in der er das Verhältnis von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft und die Herausbidlung der “Marktgesellschaft” wie des “Maschinenzeitalters” thematisiert. Als scharfsichtiger Kritiker des Wirtschaftsliberalismus zeigt er, wie die ökologischen und sozialen Lebensgrundlagen zerstört werden, wenn Märkte der Gesellschaft den Takt vorgeben und Natur, Arbeit und Geld wie Waren gehandelt werden, und wie die Gesellschaft sich zu schützen sucht. Der Vortrag arbeitet heraus, wie seine Denkfiguren dazu beitragen können, die Transformation des Gegenwartskapitalismus zu verstehen, und seine demokratisch-ökosozialistische Vision einer freien und gerechten Gesellschaft die Suche nach Wegen in eine post-kapitalistische Zukunft anregen kann.

Walter Ötsch (Cusanus Hochschule für Gesellschaftsgestaltung)
Karl Polanyi und Friedrich Hayek: zwei Ökonomen im Wien der 1920er Jahre.
Karl Polanyi und Friedrich Hayek gelten als Ökonomen mit einander ausschließenden Theorien. Dennoch teilen sie einen Grundbegriff, nämlich von „dem Markt“ in der Einzahl – dieser Begriff kann als Schlüsselbegriff des Neoliberalismus angesehen werden. Polanyi und Hayek beschreiben den Markt als relativ homogene Einheit und verstehen ihn als Ergebnis einer langen kulturellen Evolution, die durch den Staat konstruiert und mitbeeinflusst wird. Entscheidend sind aber die Unterschiede: nämlich die Vorstellungen, wie der Markt sich gebildet hat, um welche Zeiträume es dabei geht, welche Waren er umfasst, in welcher Tiefe und Weite er gesetzt wird und welche Tendenzen sich aus ihm ergeben.

Corinna Dengler (Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien)
Feminist Futures: Mit Karl Polanyi über Care in einer Postwachstumsgesellschaft nachdenken
Dieses Jahr ist feiert der Club of Rome-Bericht „Grenzen des Wachstums“ mit seiner Kernaussage, dass unendliches Wirtschaftswachstum auf einem endlichen Planeten unmöglich sei, sein fünfzigjähriges Jubiläum. Ein halbes Jahrhundert und etliche Debatten, die versuchten Wirtschaftswachstum und Nachhaltigkeit in Einklang zu bringen (z.B. nachhaltige Entwicklung, Grünes Wachstum), später, zeigt sich im letzten IPCC-Bericht deutlich, dass das „Gleiche in Grün“ schlicht nicht genug ist, um ökologische Krisen und allem voran die Klimakrise zu lösen. Vor diesem Hintergrund schließt der Postwachstumsdiskurs an die ökologische Wachstumskritik der 1970er Jahre an und sucht nachdem guten Leben für Alle innerhalb planetarer Grenzen. Wenn wir über die Konturen von Postwachstumsgesellschaften nachdenken, dürfen feministische Perspektiven nicht fehlen, denn einen Automatismus, der eine Postwachstumsgesellschaft auch gleichzeitig geschlechtergerecht macht, gibt es nicht. Dieser Beitrag stellt Debatten um Care-Arbeit (dt. Sorgearbeit, seltener: Reproduktionsarbeit) ins Zentrum und fragt: Was lässt sich von Karl Polanyi für die Transformation hin zu einer emanzipatorischen, feministischen Postwachstumsgesellschaft lernen?

Hendrik Theine (Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, BEIGEWUM – Beirat für gesellschafts-, wirtschafts- und umweltpolitische Alternativen)
Die „Wiederentdeckung“ Karl Polanyis hat zu wichtigen Debatten und Erkenntnissen in den Sozialwissenschaften rund die sozial-ökologische Transformation und die Rolle von Doppel- und Gegenbewegungen geführt. Das Buch „Klimasoziale Politik“ (herausgegeben von Attac, der Armutskonferenz und dem BEIGEWUM) schließt an eine von Polanyis zentralen Thesen an, nämlich dass der reine Fokus auf Marktprozesse die existierende soziale Krise weiter anheizen wird und damit die Erreichung der Klimaziele nicht möglich wird. Demgegenüber schlägt Klimasoziale Politik ein neues Narrativ vor, nämlich dass sozialer Fortschritt bei gleichzeitiger Reduktion von CO2-Emissionen zu erreichen ist. Klimasoziale Politik hat damit den Anspruch, eine grundlegende Verbesserung unseres Lebens sowohl auf sozialer als auch klimapolitischer Ebene zu ermöglichen. Sie diskutiert konkrete Maßnahmen, um eine sozial gerechte und ökologisch nachhaltige Gesellschaft zu gestalten. Die Bereiche umfassen nicht nur menschliche Grundbedürfnisse wie Gesundheit, Wohnen oder Ernährung. Auch Geschlechtergerechtigkeit, Inklusion, Pflege, Überreichtum und ein zukunftsgerichtetes Staatsbudget sind zentrale Themen des Buches.

More ‘News’: 

We invite you to dive deeper with us into the topic of “provisioning” with the fields of care & housing
We are delighted to invite you to our New Webinar Series on “Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation”
Einstieg in das Leben und Werk Karl Polanyi’s – die Vorträge als Videos
Einladung zu unserer Ausstellungs-Finissage
Join us for the public lecture by our third Vienna Karl Polanyi Visiting Professor Ayşe Buğra on May 17th @7pm
In Vienna for the first time! From May 4th to June 21st at the Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien!
Andreas Novy in INTERNATIONAL – der Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik zu Freiheitsverständnissen in der Pandemiepolitik.
Interview with IKPS Vice-President Dr. Brigitte Aulenbacher on the topic of “The Great Transformation” for CAOÖ Podcast. 20th of September.
Zhang Runkun on the Importance of Polanyi’s work in China. 31st of May.

Public Lecture by 3rd visiting professor Ayşe Buğra

Visiting Professorship - Ayşe Buğra

Universalism, cultural difference and the “revenge of politics”: Revisiting Karl Polanyi in the contemporary global political environment

May 17th, 2022

There is an apparent contradiction between the denial and affirmation of diversity in neoliberal global capitalism. On the one hand, it was assumed that “There is no alternative” to market-dominated, open economies, leaving little room for diversity in economic institutions and policies. On the other hand, the “cultural turn” predicted geopolitical conflicts due to a “clash of civilizations” or promoted “alternative modernities” in which social and political relations and institutions are shaped differently from those in Western democracies. 

The lecture problematizes this “culture talk” that impedes a proper diagnosis of the current threats to democracy and the rule of law in both Western and non-Western countries.

By drawing on Polanyi’s idea of the “countermovement” against the disruptions caused by a market-dominated economic order, illiberal political parties and movements that challenge liberal democracy are part of a reactionary countermovement. Claims to exclusive representation of the “real people” against “internal and external enemies” of the nation are sustained by idealizing the will to protect society’s historically given cultural identity. Contrary to such culturalization and in line with Polanyi’s reflections on “the reality of society” and “freedom in a complex society”, it has to be stressed that the ideals of equality and freedom are not limited to Western societies. Empowered by information and communication technologies, all over the world dissidents who embrace the ideals of equality and freedom will continue to exist in increasing numbers. Ignoring their voices by references to civilizational difference is neither compatible with global justice nor with peaceful international co-existence.

Ausstellung im Wirtschaftsmuseum

Events

Ausstellung im Wirtschaftsmuseum WIEN

14th April, 2022

Einladung zur Eröffnung
Im Rahmen einer kleinen aber feinen Eröffnungsveranstaltung laden wir unsere Mitglieder und Interessierte am Dienstag, den 3. Mai 2022 um 18:30 zur gemeinsamen Feier des Beginns der Ausstellung im Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien in der Vogelsanggasse 36, 1050 Wien.

Programm:
Eröffnung & Moderation: Andreas Novy (WU/IKPS)
Keynotes:

Claus Thomasberger (IKPS)
Karl Polanyi und das Rote Wien

Karl Polanyi und das Rote Wien – eine vielschichtige Beziehung: 1886 in Wien geboren, kam Polanyi im Jahr 1919 – schwerkrank und durch eine Kriegsverletzung geschwächt – in die Stadt zurück. Hier traf er seine spätere Frau. Hier wurde seine Tochter geboren. In Wien arbeitete er bis 1933, als er sich aus politischen Gründen zur Emigration gezwungen sah, als Redakteur des „Österreichischen Volkswirts“, der damals wichtigsten mitteleuropäischen Wirtschafts- und Finanzwochenzeitung. Gleichzeitig beteiligte er sich an der Debatte über die sozialistische Rechnungslegung, die von Ludwig von Mises, dem in den 1920er Jahren führenden Vertreter der Schule der Österreichischen Schule der Volkswirtschaftslehre, initiiert worden war, wie auch an den Strategiediskussionen, die am Rande des Austromarxismus geführt wurden. In Wien verbrachte Polanyi die prägenden Jahre seines Lebens. Der Vortrag zeichnet in wenigen Strichen nach, wie sich Polanyis Erfahrungen im Roten Wien in seinen späteren Werken, die ihn zu einem der bedeutendsten Sozialwissenschaftler des 20. Jahrhunderts werden ließen, niederschlugen.

Maria Markantonatou (University of the Agean, IKPS)
Die Covid-Pandemie verstehen: Inspirationen von Karl Polanyi – per Video
To cope with the effects of the lockdowns and to try to return to “normality”, governments around the world, and even self-portrayed neoliberal ones, resorted to massive spending and the breaking of pre-pandemic fiscal orthodoxies. Thus, a current understanding of the pandemic management is that “The state is back. Long live globalization”, that states have “a choice between authoritarian nationalism and an open global order” and that “the return of government” ends an era “in which power and responsibility migrated from states to markets”. Is this the case? Does the rise of authoritarian nationalism conflict with the neoliberal globalization of the past decades? Karl Polanyi stressed that the self-regulating market system was not established spontaneously, and the state intervened to assist the maintenance of the market and correct the effects of crises borne by capitalist dynamics. What does this tell us about today’s state interventions implemented to correct the pandemic crisis effects? Do they restore or challenge the pre-pandemic economic governance?

Brigitte Aulenbacher (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, IKPS)
Von der entfesselten Wirtschaft zur solidarischen Gesellschaft: Das Ausstellungskonzept

Wie ein roter Faden zieht sich die hochaktuelle Frage, wie die Menschheit die industrielle Zivilisation überleben kann, durch Karl Polanyis Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte des Kapitalismus hindurch, in der er das Verhältnis von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft und die Herausbidlung der “Marktgesellschaft” wie des “Maschinenzeitalters” thematisiert. Als scharfsichtiger Kritiker des Wirtschaftsliberalismus zeigt er, wie die ökologischen und sozialen Lebensgrundlagen zerstört werden, wenn Märkte der Gesellschaft den Takt vorgeben und Natur, Arbeit und Geld wie Waren gehandelt werden, und wie die Gesellschaft sich zu schützen sucht. Der Vortrag arbeitet heraus, wie seine Denkfiguren dazu beitragen können, die Transformation des Gegenwartskapitalismus zu verstehen, und seine demokratisch-ökosozialistische Vision einer freien und gerechten Gesellschaft die Suche nach Wegen in eine post-kapitalistische Zukunft anregen kann.

More ‘News’: 

We invite you to dive deeper with us into the topic of “provisioning” with the fields of care & housing
We are delighted to invite you to our New Webinar Series on “Shaping Provisioning Systems for Social-Ecological Transformation”
Einstieg in das Leben und Werk Karl Polanyi’s – die Vorträge als Videos
Einladung zu unserer Ausstellungs-Finissage
Join us for the public lecture by our third Vienna Karl Polanyi Visiting Professor Ayşe Buğra on May 17th @7pm
In Vienna for the first time! From May 4th to June 21st at the Wirtschaftsmuseum Wien!
Andreas Novy in INTERNATIONAL – der Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik zu Freiheitsverständnissen in der Pandemiepolitik.
Interview with IKPS Vice-President Dr. Brigitte Aulenbacher on the topic of “The Great Transformation” for CAOÖ Podcast. 20th of September.
Zhang Runkun on the Importance of Polanyi’s work in China. 31st of May.

Covid-19 und Demokratie

Beitrag in "INTERNATIONAL - Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik"

COVID-19 und demokratie

In der nächsten Ausgabe “INTERNATIONAL”, der Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik, erscheint ein Beitrag zu den aktuellen Diskussionen rund um Freiheit in der Pandemiepolitik von Andreas Novy. Vorab bereits hier für unsere Mitglieder zu lesen.

January, 2022

Andreas Novy

Es ist fast schon ein Gemeinplatz festzuhalten, dass
Covid-19 die westliche Demokratie auf die Probe stellt. Die Gefahr ist aber
nicht diejenige, die auf ermüdende Weise die öffentliche Debatte der letzten
Monate prägt: dass nämlich durch Corona der gesellschaftliche Zusammenhalt
bröckle. Ja, eine gewisse Polarisierung der Bevölkerung ist zu beobachten. Doch
diese passierte nicht aus sich selbst heraus, sondern wurde in Österreich
massiv von der FPÖ und anderen staatskritischen Gruppen vorangetrieben. Die FPÖ
hat eine politisch autoritäre und kulturell reaktionäre Grundhaltung, die sie
auf opportunistische Weise mal mehr, mal weniger stark betont. Mit dem neuen
Parteichef Herbert Kickl wird aktuell radikalisiert. Die Covid-Maßnahmen sind
ein Vehikel dafür. Eine Partei, die in der Vergangenheit selbst verpflichtende
Impfungen forderte, heftet sich nun das Banner der Freiheit auf ihre Fahnen.
Das sollte nicht verwundern, trägt die FPÖ ja „Freiheit“ sogar in ihrem Namen.
Doch welche Freiheit meint eine Partei, die gleichzeitig autoritär und
reaktionär ist? Leider ist es keine Erfindung von Kickl, Bolsonaro und Trump,
freiheitlich, autoritär und reaktionär gleichzeitig zu sein.

Tatsächlich können sich all diese reaktionären Politiker,
denen oft vorschnell Unwissen unterstellt wird, auf eine bestimmte Tradition
westlichen Denkens berufen: In einer Spielart des Liberalismus – der Hayek‘schen
Variante eines Neoliberalismus, der den angelsächsischen
Wirtschaftsliberalismus radikalisierte – wird Freiheit absolut gesetzt. Freiheit
wird einzig negativ definiert, nämlich durch die Abwesenheit von staatlichem
Zwang. Diese Spielart des Liberalismus kokettierte immer mit einem
Sozialdarwinismus des „Rechts des Stärkeren“. John Lockes Besitzindividualismus
legitimierte schon im 18. Jahrhundert die Enteignung der amerikanischen
Indigenen, weil sie das Land nicht so „vernünftig“ nutzten wie die weißen
Siedler. Dieses Verständnis von Freiheit radikalisierte sich mit der
neoliberalen Globalisierung der letzten Jahrzehnte und wird in der
Covid-19-Pandemie zu einer echten Gefahr für die westliche Zivilisation. Die
radikalste Variante dieses Hyperindividualismus findet sich im Silicon Valley,
verkörpert von Peter Thiel, dem neuen Arbeitgeber von Altkanzler Sebastian
Kurz.

Friedrich Hayek sah noch ein Spannungsverhältnis von
Demokratie und Freiheit. Freie individuelle Entscheidungen seien Grundlage
einer freien Gesellschaft. Der Markt als effiziente
Informationsverarbeitungsmaschine schaffe eine spontane Ordnung, die durch den
Preismechanismus die gesellschaftlich besten Ergebnisse produziere. Der Markt,
so Hayek, wisse mehr als alle Experten. Daher müsse die politische Demokratie
so begrenzt werden, dass sie nicht willkürlich die wirtschaftlichen Freiheiten
der Einzelnen beschränkt – gleichsam einer marktgerechten Demokratie. Und schon
Hayek postulierte, dass Freiheit in einer Diktatur überleben könne, nicht aber
in einer „unbegrenzten Demokratie“. Damit meinte er eine Demokratie, die nicht
nur das ungestörte Funktionieren des Marktes sicherstellt, sondern die auch in
die Art zu leben und zu arbeiten eingreift. Dieses neoliberale Verständnis von
Demokratie und Freiheit prägte die letzten Jahrzehnte. Nicht nur Libertäre,
sondern auch Angela Merkel, Barack Obama und die de-facto-Verfassung der
Europäischen Union orientierten sich am Grundgedanken, staatliche Eingriffe in
die Marktwirtschaft möglichst gering zu halten.

Neoliberale erzogen die Menschen, das Ausmaß ihrer Freiheit
an der Höhe des Bankkontos und an der Nicht-Einmischung des Staates zu messen.
Die Freiheit zu konsumieren galt mehr als die Freiheit zu wählen. Die Linke sympathisierte
immer öfter mit einem weltoffenen Linksliberalismus: Individuelle Lebensformen sollten
durch Antidiskriminierungsgesetze gesichert, individuelle Freiheitsräume ausgeweitet,
der Staat beschränkt werden. Das gute Leben wurde privatisiert: Die eine
leisteten sich für ihre Kinder teure Privatschulen, die anderen gründeten
Alternativschulen. In einer derart individualisierten Gesellschaft ist es die einzige
Aufgabe des Staates, möglichst wenig zu stören, und die einzige Aufgabe der
Demokratie, staatliche Willkür zu verhindern. Die Folge ist ein schleichender Legitimationsverlust
von Politik und Staat.

Die Plattformkapitalisten des Silicon Valley orientieren
sich an Hayek und fordern einen Hyperindividualismus, der von möglichst allen
staatlichen Regeln und Zwängen befreit ist. Peter Thiel unterstützte im
Unterschied zu den meisten anderen Plattformkapitalisten Donald Trump. Er
versteht sich als Nonkonformist. Er predigt für eine Welt, in der jeder seines
Glückes Schmied ist. Eine Welt, die gut ist, weil sich die Stärksten und Besten
durchsetzen. Eben dieser Peter Thiel glaubt auch nicht, dass Freiheit und
Demokratie miteinander vereinbar sind. Damit ist er konsequenter, radikaler als
Hayek.

Die Covid-Pandemie eröffnet dieser antistaatlichen Ideologie
neue Möglichkeiten. Jede effiziente Pandemiepolitik muss eingreifen in das
Leben und Arbeiten von Menschen. In Ostasien erfolgte dies geplant und vor
allem anfangs für westliche Verhältnisse zu einschneidend. Tatsache ist, dass
in den Demokratien und Diktaturen Ostasiens die Verwerfungen der Pandemie
deutlich geringer waren als in Europa und Amerika.

In Österreich ergriff die FPÖ die Chance zur weiteren
Destabilisierung einer politischen Ordnung, die schon neoliberal destabilisiert
und durch ÖVP-Skandale noch weiter delegitimiert ist. Pandemiemaßnahmen gelten
manchen pauschal als ungebührliche Eingriffe in die Privatsphäre. Dem Staat wird
das Recht abgesprochen, den Einzelnen Grenzen zu setzen. Covid-Maßnahmen werden
als Grundrechtsverletzungen bezeichnet, auch wenn sie der Verfassungsgerichtshof
erlaubt. Letztlich verschließen sich „Impfgegner“ allen Autoritäten – der
demokratisch gewählten Bundesregierung, dem demokratisch gewählten Parlament,
in dem die meisten Maßnahmen von vier der fünf Parteien beschlossen wurden, dem
Verfassungsgerichtshof, der in bestimmten Fragen über Regierung und Parlament
steht.

Es stimmt, dass viele der Demonstrierenden das autoritäre
und reaktionäre Gedankengut eines Herbert Kickl und Peter Thiel nicht teilen.
Aber alle Demonstrierenden leugnen, dass ein Gemeinwesen Freiheit und
Solidarität erfordert. Alle Demonstrierenden teilen ein verantwortungsloses
Freiheitsverständnis, das staatliche Regeln grundsätzlich problematisch findet.
Doch es ist schlicht verqueres Denken zu glauben, Verbote seien prinzipiell schlecht.
Nur weil es verboten ist zu stehlen, kann Privates genutzt werden. Nur weil auf
der Straße nicht gespielt werden darf, können sich Autos rasch bewegen. Und nur
wenn es Autos verboten wäre, auf der Straße schneller zu fahren als Schrittgeschwindigkeit,
könnten Kinder auf ebendiesen spielen. Verbote sind Grundlage von Freiheit,
dialektisch miteinander verbunden.

Die Demonstrierenden wiederholen, ohne es zu wissen, die
Auseinandersetzungen der Zwischenkriegszeit. Für Hans Kelsen, Architekt der
österreichischen Bundesverfassung, war Demokratie die beste Herrschaftsform,
weil sie diejenige ist, die individuelle Freiheiten am wenigsten beschränkt. Moderne
Gesellschaften sollten sich, Kelsen folgend, am Freiheitsbegriff der antiken
Polis orientieren, in der Freiheit und Verantwortung Hand in Hand gingen.
Demokratie ist dann eine Form kollektiver Selbstbeschränkung, Freiheit eine
Form koordinierten und gemeinsamen Handelns der Bürgerinnen und Bürger. Diesen
sozialen Freiheitsbegriff unterschied Kelsen von einem germanischen und
anarchischen Freiheitsbegriff möglichst unbehinderter Selbstentfaltung.

Für Kelsen ist Demokratie die Herrschaft der Mehrheit. Da
ihm bewusst war, dass dies gefährlich werden könne, gibt es in unserer
Verfassung auch den Schutz von Minderheiten, von Grundrechten und der
Privatsphäre. Demokratie und Freiheit stehen in der österreichischen
Bundesverfassung in einem Spannungsverhältnis. Einzelne Maßnahmen – wie eine
Impfplicht – sind immer in diesem abzuwägen. Das letzte Wort hat in diesen
Fragen der Verfassungsgerichtshof.

Damit sind wir mitten in den Debatten zur Pandemiepolitik,
die als Trauerspiel die ganz konkreten, schmerzhaften Folgen illustriert, zu
denen ein falsches Verständnis von Freiheit und Demokratie führt. Niemandem ist
die Freiheit genommen, sich zu betrinken. Aber es wäre ein verqueres
Freiheitsverständnis, die Freiheit einzufordern, alkoholisiert Auto zu fahren. Ebenso
ist es ein verqueres Freiheitsverständnis, die Freiheit einer Minderheit nicht
zu beschränken, andere mit einem potenziell tödlichen Virus anzustecken. Die
demokratische Alternative zu solch verquerem Freiheitsverständnis heißt,
Verantwortung für das Gemeinwesen zu übernehmen – um Leben zu retten und
mittelfristig wieder ein sicheres Leben zu ermöglichen.

Für Kelsen haben demokratisch legitimierte
EntscheidungsträgerInnen die Aufgabe, das Zusammenleben so zu regeln, dass
möglichst viele in möglichst vielen Belangen frei sein können. So viel Freiheit
wie möglich, so viel staatliche Eingriffe zum Schutz der Bevölkerung wie nötig.
Die Pandemie effektiv zu bekämpfen, hier in Österreich und durch effiziente
Impfkampagnen auch weltweit, ist oberstes Ziel einer Politik, die langfristig
wieder Freiheit für alle schaffen will.

Hier hat die EU international versagt, weil es noch immer keine vorübergehende Aufhebung der Impfpatente gibt. In Österreich haben die EntscheidungsträgerInnen zu oft zu spät gehandelt. Es gelang der Bundesregierung nicht, zu erklären, dass Freiheit mit Verantwortung einhergehen muss, dass wir selbst impfen und dem Globalen Süden zur Impfung verhelfen müssen, um durch andauerndes
Infektionsgeschehen nicht laufend gefährlichere Mutationen zu produzieren, und
dass Freiheit die Solidarität mit Immungeschwächten, akut Erkrankten, Verletzten
und dem Gesundheitspersonal erfordert. In einer Pandemie so wie in der
Klimakrise sitzen alle im selben Schiff – auch wenn sich im Notfall manche
besser retten können als andere. Gesunken ist auch die Titanic.

Kelsen verließ Österreich 1930, weil sein
Demokratieverständnis von den Christlichsozialen nicht geteilt wurde.
Autoritäres Denken ersetzte in den 1930er Jahren sein Verständnis einer
aufgeklärten und pluralistischen Gesellschaft, die immer Kompromisse braucht
und in der immer einige unzufrieden sein werden. Die zentrale Lehre aus dem damaligen
Scheitern der Demokratie ist: Ist Demokratie nicht imstande, ein gesichertes
und gutes Leben zu gewährleisten, dann greifen Menschen nach autoritären
Lösungen. Dann kann ein pervertierter Freiheitsbegriff von Staatsverweigerern
der Demokratie den Todesstoß versetzen. Dann sind die Corona-Demos nur der
Auftakt zur Demontage unserer liberalen Demokratie.

Nicht Herbert Kickl, nicht die liberalen und esoterischen
Nicht-FPÖler, die gemeinsam mit Rechtsextremen demonstrieren, sind das Problem.
Das Problem ist libertäres Denken und libertäres Tun, das staatliches Handeln
diskreditiert mit einem einzigen Zweck: selbst die Macht an sich zu reißen.
Peter Thiel geht weiter als Hayek. Nicht Markt und Konkurrenz, sondern
Monopole, die von den Starken und Erfolgreichen kontrolliert werden, seien das
Rückgrat einer hyperindividualisierten Gesellschaft. Wenige Auserwählte,
Entrepreneurs des Silicon Valleys und andere Unternehmensbosse, schreiben das
Skript nicht nur ihrer geheimen Algorithmen, sondern auch unser aller Zukunft.

 

So löst sich letztlich das Rätsel, wie man freiheitlich,
autoritär und reaktionär gleichermaßen sein kann. Neoliberale so wie Thiel
perfektionieren einen Trick: Anti-Autoritarismus und Freiheitsdenken für die
Masse zu propagieren, um sie letztlich selbst autoritär zu führen. Kurzum: Weg
mit den alten Autoritäten! Her mit den neuen Eliten! An die Stelle der „Altparteien“,
des „korrupten, streitenden, nicht handlungsfähigen“ politischen Systems tritt dann
eine neue Form des Antidemokratismus: die unheilige Allianz von Trump und Thiel,
von wirtschaftlicher und politischer Macht. In den USA scheiterte Trump am 6.
Jänner 2021. In Österreich hat Ibiza eine Regierung zu Fall gebracht, die stolz
war auf die enge Kooperation von Politik und Wirtschaft – bis zu den nun im
Raum stehenden Korruptionsvorwürfen. Demokratie kann also Bestand haben. Aber
nur, wenn sie ein verqueres Freiheitsdenken in Schranken hält und ihre
Vordenker entmachtet. 

Nancy Fraser’s analysis of the Capitalist Society

Karl Polanyi Visiting Professorship

Nancy Fraser’s analysis of the capitalist society: intellectual traditions, theoretical approaches, and visions for the future

Laudatio at the inauguration event of the 1st Viennese Karl Polanyi visiting professor on 4th May 2021, Vienna City Hall by Brigitte Aulenbacher

7th May, 2021

It is a great honour—and an equally great challenge—to deliver this speech in recognition of Nancy Fraser’s rich and multifarious work. And I am delighted to be doing so on behalf of the International Karl Polanyi Society. The last time my colleagues and I from the International Karl Polanyi Society met Nancy Fraser was two years ago. It was at an event at Bennington College in Vermont on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the publication of Karl Polanyi’s magnum opus The Great Transformation, which he had written at the college. It perhaps came as no surprise to those who know Nancy Fraser when she said at that event that she would in fact consider herself as ‘Marxist’ or ‘Marxian’ rather than ‘Polanyian’. It would have probably been just as unsurprising had she said, for example, that she considered herself a ‘feminist’.

At the time, we had no idea that, before too long, a visiting professorship in Karl Polanyi’s name would be created in Vienna—the city that had such an impact on his life and work—and that we would have the tremendous honour and pleasure of welcoming Nancy Fraser as our very first visiting professor. But how does this fit together: an internationally renowned author and researcher, who has contributed decisively to the ongoing rediscovery of Karl Polanyi’s work and made it accessible for constructive discussion, yet who epitomises so much more?

In this brief address I will try to illustrate how Nancy Fraser’s oeuvre drives the discussion forward, the discussion which we seek to encourage in the spirit of Polanyi and through the newly established visiting professorship in Vienna as well as a lecture series, this year’s motto of which is: ‘Countermovements: putting the economy in its place’. I shall do so by presenting some unique aspects that highlight the many facets of Nancy Fraser’s work.  

Intellectual Traditions

Nancy Fraser is a social philosopher and effortlessly crosses the boundaries between disciplines. At times we encounter thoughts and ideas related to political science, at other times to sociology, alongside her philosophical reflections. What remains constant however, is that her ideas are always rooted in long-standing intellectual traditions. As the internationally renowned representative of critical theory that she is, Nancy Fraser has always sought to engage with Jürgen Habermas (Fraser 1992, 2015). Her theory of justice—rooting in feminist research (Fraser 1996, 2001)—developed out of the controversy with Axel Honneth and her critiques of the limits of his theory of recognition (Fraser/Honneth 2003). Her analysis of capitalism and society is strongly influenced by Marx, we find Polanyi’s work inscribed in her theory of the contemporary capitalist society, accompanied by reference to Antonio Gramsci—and in her ‘conversation in critical theory’ with Rahel Jaeggi she brings all these distinct intellectual traditions together (Fraser/Jaeggi 2018). So, can we in fact identify a common theme?

In my view, her ultimate objective, as she spelled out with Axel Honneth in the tradition of critical theory, is to ‘conceptualise capitalist society as a “totality”’ (Fraser/Honneth 2003, p. 10). Her aim—and indeed, that of the various intellectual traditions listed above, albeit each in its own distinctive way—is to discern the social structures and interrelationships that cause the ecological, economic, social, cultural and political crises we have witnessed over the past few decades and which have so far had a considerable impact on the 21st century (Fraser/Jaeggi 2018).

“According to Nancy Fraser, capitalism as such, regarding both its emergence and various forms of manifestation, cannot be separated from sexism and racism.”

Understanding this development of society, the feminist Nancy Fraser explains, requires a broadening of the perspective on capitalism and society. We need an analysis of capitalism that regards not only class inequalities, but also the dimensions of gender and race as constitutive of this social formation (Fraser 2018a). According to Nancy Fraser, capitalism as such, regarding both its emergence and various forms of manifestation, cannot be separated from sexism and racism. In this sense, capitalism is neither compatible with the idea which Nancy Fraser—well ahead of her time—introduced to the discussion in the 1990s: the organisation of society according to the ‘universal caregiver’ principle, a conception of humanity and idea of man which aspire, in keeping with ‘anti-poverty’, ‘anti-exploitation’, ‘anti-androcentrism’, ‘equality of respect’, etc. (Fraser 1994, p. 610; see also Fraser 1996), for all people to be able to care for themselves and others. Nor is capitalism conceivable without colonialism and slavery, a circumstance that is currently being condemned by the Black Lives Matter movement and has led Nancy Fraser to speak of ‘racialized capitalism’ (Fraser 2018b, 2018c).

In my understanding, Nancy Fraser seeks to develop a feminist and intersectional theory of justice and an analysis and critique of capitalism that traces the relations of dominance and causes of crisis to the economy and the relation between economy, ecology and society, while at the same time pursuing emancipatory change.

Theory of Justice

Nancy Fraser’s (2001, 2003, 2006, 2007) theory of justice, developed at the beginning of this century, is highly relevant and topical, as we shall see in the following. I will venture to highlight some of its key aspects here. In her widely acknowledged concept of social justice, she recombines what has been separated historically: the topics of redistribution and recognition, commonly more closely associated with the ‘old Left’ or the ‘new Left’ under the label of class politics or identity politics, respectively (Fraser/Honneth 2003, pp. 8; Fraser 2009, p. 481). And she reflects on the issue of the ‘representation’ of people in a globalised world, the nation-state-based structure of which does not provide for the participation of all people, even in democracies (Fraser 2007). Nancy Fraser’s ‘three-dimensional’ concept of social justice focuses on economy, culture and politics as the domains that structure and determine the practice of social life (Fraser 2004, p. 19, Fraser 2007). It is where the decisions concerning the redistribution of wealth and goods, the recognition of diversity and the opportunities for influencing the destinies of society are made. A just society, according to Fraser (2003, p. 55), can be measured by the extent to which the norm of ‘participatory parity’ of all members of society has been established. The path to such a society is marked by struggles for redistribution, recognition and representation, in the course of which marginalised and discriminated groups in society have to claim their right to participation in the face of institutional obstacles. Fraser’s ‘perspectivist dualism’ states that questions of redistribution always also entail a dimension of recognition and vice versa, and the dialogical and deliberative negotiation of issues of redistribution, recognition and representation is without alternative in a democratic society. The ‘political sphere serves […] as a kind of stage on which the struggles for redistribution and recognition take place’ (Fraser 2007, p. 351) and where the question of who is entitled to make which demands is determined and new forms of democratic participation must be developed.

Theory of Capitalism

With regard to Marx and Polanyi, Nancy Fraser argues ‘why two Karls are better than one’, for ‘each of these Karls affords some indispensable insights for understanding capitalist crisis’ (Fraser 2018d, p. 67). According to Nancy Fraser, society is suffering from a fundamental contradiction inherent in capitalism. Building on Marx, she defines this contradiction as follows: the accumulation-driven dynamic of the capitalist mode of production destroys the very foundations of social and ecological reproduction on which it relies for its own functioning (Fraser 2016, 2018a). Here, her perspective focuses on the relations of ownership and exploitation, which subordinate humanity and nature to the logic of capital valorisation and accumulation and which is where the appropriation of surplus value and the wealth redistribution in favour of the 1 % takes place. Yet this Karl (Marx), she argues, is too fixated on inner-economic processes. Nancy Fraser considers the other Karl (Polanyi), by contrast, to be the best diagnostician of crisis of our time. His concept of ‘fictitious commodities’, according to which the destructive commodification of land, labour and money in line with the requirements of the ‘self-regulating markets’ leads to the ‘demolition of society’ (Polanyi 2001, pp. 71ff), explains the more recent ecological, (finance-)economic and social crises which have proven to be politically momentous for some time (Fraser 2012). To some extent, however, Nancy Fraser is at odds with this Karl as well. Even though he does address the relation between economy and society, society seems to remain a ‘black box’ (Fraser 2018d, 71, see also Fraser 2012).

“Yet this Karl (Marx), she argues, is too fixated on inner-economic processes. Nancy Fraser considers the other Karl (Polanyi), by contrast, to be the best diagnostician of crisis of our time.”

Correspondingly, Nancy Fraser’s own approach differs. The decision about what is to be organised in a marketised, private-commercial, familial or state-coordinated form, and in what way this is linked to social inequalities and occurs not only in the economy or in the relation between economy and society. It occurs also in ‘border struggles’ that develop along the ‘social institutional order’ of capitalism (Fraser 2018d, p.72, see also Fraser 2018a) and are closely linked to the division of labour. While Polanyi (2001, pp. 79f.) considers history to be the result of a ‘double movement’, that is, the ‘movement’ of the market-fundamentalist commodification of land, labour and money and the ‘countermovements’ through which society seeks to protect itself from the consequences of market dynamics, Nancy Fraser (2012), proposes her concept of the ‘triple movement’, which is close to her conception of social justice. This concept includes—besides the Polanyian double movement—those social protests and struggles that are neither of the Marxian type (i.e. directed against exploitation) nor of the Polanyian type (i.e. for the protection against the consequences of market fundamentalism), but which pursue the goal of ‘emancipation’ in the sense of recognition and may be linked to a critique of exploitation and the dynamics of the market, but not necessarily so.

The Analysis of Contemporary Crises

Nancy Fraser sparks debate. I would like to illustrate this based on two specific examples. The first pertains to populism, the second, to feminism with regard to the present and the future.

With respect to populism, Nancy Fraser (2019a, pp. 11ff.) emphasises the path from ‘progressive’ to ‘reactionary’ and ultimately to ‘hyperreactionary neo-liberalism’, not only in the United States. In her view, these developments were, and continue to be—before, during and after the financial crisis—the cause of economic, ecological and social crises and of the intensification of social inequalities and divisions, while also leading to far-reaching shifts in the relationship between capitalism and democracy. Alongside the rise of anti-democratic forces, the latter includes the destabilisation of the political institutions which the capitalist market economy relies on for its functioning—given that it does not exist independently from society, as Karl Polanyi (2001, 1979) made clear. To Nancy Fraser, ‘today’s crisis of democracy is a dimension of the capitalist crisis’ (Fraser 2019b, p. 82), as neoliberalism is stretched to its limits. Drawing on Gramsci, she speaks in his words of an ‘interregnum’, in which ‘the old is dying and the new cannot be born’ (Fraser 2019a). This goes along with a ‘hegemonic gap—and the struggle to fill it’ (Fraser 2019a, p. 18). As regards the chances of managing to form a ‘counterhegemonic bloc’ (Gramsci) in light of a society shaken by crisis, she provocatively states that the current situation ‘leaves progressive populism as the likeliest candidate’ (Fraser 2019a, p. 30). To her, redistribution and recognition are topics through which ‘progressive populism’ can take effect both subjectively and objectively, reach people and thus change conditions, considering the existential social uncertainties felt by large parts of the population and the struggles discriminated groups face to assert their rights.

Regarding my second example and to Nancy Fraser (2009), the history of neoliberalism is also one of the co-optation of feminism. Policies of gender equality in the context of the given economic order have helped only very few women to climb up the social/professional ladder and achieve real success, while the ‘99%’ suffer the consequences of the economic, ecological, social and political crises. Nancy Fraser has provided inspiring contributions to the debate across a wide range of feminist and intersectional critiques of capitalism, always with the objective of inverting relations that are the wrong way round—to paraphrase Marx—and reversing the subordination of social-ecological reproduction to economic production (Arruzza/Bhattacharya/Fraser 2019). With regard to our motto: this also includes ‘putting the economy in its place’ in society, instead of—in the words of Karl Polanyi (2001, p. 79)—degrading society to the status of an ‘accessory of the economic system’. To Nancy Fraser, ‘progressive populism’ is not a ‘stable endpoint. Progressive populism could end up being transitional—a way station en route to some new postcapitalist form of society’. (Fraser 2019, p. 39)

The Vision for the Future

Nancy Fraser’s work is pervaded by a holistic view on economic, social, cultural and political claims to participation and egalitarian distribution, equal recognition and participation.

In the last chapter of his main work, entitled ‘Freedom in a complex society’, Karl Polanyi envisages a society that could be ‘just and free’, ‘when the utopian experiment of a self-regulating market will be no more than a memory’ (Polanyi 2001, p. 258). In this society, the ‘right to non-conformity’ (Polanyi 2001, pp. 260ff.) as a form of individual freedom would take centre stage just as much as the organisation and structuring of society in a way that would break with the structures of privilege and replace existing economic organisation with forms of ‘planning’, ‘regulation’ and ‘control’ in order to guarantee freedom for all (Polanyi 2001, pp. 264ff.).

Nancy Fraser’s (2019c) vision for the future is one of ecological socialism, in which the centralism of the failed socialist systems is entirely alien, in which the relations of ownership and economic organisation are subjected to a radical democratic restructuring and in which it ultimately becomes a collective decision which growth paths are chosen, and how and for what purposes surplus value is actually used.

When comparing both Karl Polanyi’s (2001) and Nancy Fraser’s (2003, 2019c) conceptions of a ‘just and free’ socialist society, it turns out that they may have far more in common than is often assumed.

Today, and in the coming days, we can look forward to being part of some exciting discussions with our very first Karl Polanyi visiting professor Nancy Fraser, contributing to the intellectual ‘countermovements’ of our time.

References:

Arruzza, Cinzia / Bhattacharya, Tithi / Fraser, Nancy (2019): Feminism for the 99%: A Manifesto, London/New York: Verso

Fraser, Nancy (1992): Was ist kritisch an der Kritischen Theorie? Habermas und die Ge-schlechterfrage, in: Ostner, Ilona / Lichtblau, Klaus (Hg.): Feministische Vernunft-kritik, Frankfurt/New York: Campus Verlag, pp. 99-146

Fraser, Nancy (1994): “After the Family Wage: Gender Equity and the Welfare State”, Political Theory, vol. 22 no. 4 (November 1994), Newbury Park: Sage Publishing, pp. 591-618

Fraser, Nancy (1996): Die Gleichheit der Geschlechter und das Wohlfahrtssystem: Ein postindustrielles Gedankenexperiment, in: Nagl-Docekal, Herta / Pauer-Studer, Herlinde (Hg.): Politische Theorie. Differenz und Lebensqualität, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, pp. 469-498

Fraser, Nancy (2001): Die halbierte Gerechtigkeit. Schlüsselbegriffe des postindustriellen Sozialstaats, aus dem Amerikanischen von Karin Wördemann, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp

Fraser, Nancy (2003): Soziale Gerechtigkeit im Zeitalter der Identitätspolitik. Umverteilung, Anerkennung und Beteiligung, in: Fraser, Nancy / Honneth, Axel (Hg.): Umverteilung oder Anerkennung? Eine politisch-philosophische Kontroverse, übersetzt von Burkhardt Wolf, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, pp. 13-128

Fraser Nancy (2004): Feministische Politik im Zeitalter der Anerkennung: ein zweidimensionaler Ansatz für Geschlechtergerechtigkeit, in: Beerhorst, Joachim / Demirović, Alex / Guggemos, Michael (Hg.): Kritische Theorie im gesellschaftlichen Strukturwandel, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, pp. 453-474

Fraser, Nancy (2006): Mapping the Feminist Imagination. From Redistribution to Recognition to Representation, in: Degener, Ursula / Rosenzweig, Beate (Hg.): Die Neuverhandlung sozialer Gerechtigkeit: feministische Analysen und Perspektiven, Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, pp. 37-51

Fraser, Nancy (2007): Zur Neubestimmung von Gerechtigkeit in einer globalisierten Welt, in: Heidbrink, Ludger / Hirsch, Alfred (Hg.): Staat ohne Verantwortung?: Zum Wandel der Aufgaben von Staat und Politik, Frankfurt a.M.: Campus Verlag, pp. 343-372

Fraser, Nancy (2009): Feminismus, Kapitalismus und die List der Geschichte. in: Forst, Rainer / Hartmann, Martin / Jaeggi, Rahel / Saar, Martin (Hg.): Sozialphilosophie und Kritik, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp, pp. 481-505

Fraser, Nancy, (2015): “Legitimation Crisis? On the Political Contradictions of Financialized Capitalism”, Critical Historical Studies vol. 2, no. 2, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, pp. 1–33

Fraser, Nancy (2016): “Contradictions of Capital and Care”, New Left Review 100, London: New Left Review, pp. 99–117

Fraser, Nancy (2018a): “Krise, Kritik und Kapitalismus, Eine Orientierungshilfe für das 21. Jahrhundert”, in: Scheele, Alexandra / Wöhl, Stefanie (Hg.): Feminismus und Marxismus, Weinheim/Basel: Beltz Juventa, pp. 40-58

Fraser, Nancy (2018b): “From Exploitation to Expropriation: Historical Geographies of Racialized Capitalism”, Economic Geography 94, no. 1, pp. 1-17

Fraser, Nancy (2018c): “Is Capitalism Necessarily Racist?” [2018 Presidential Address, APA Eastern Division], Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association, vol. 92, pp. 21–42

Fraser, Nancy (2018d): Why Two Karls are Better than One, Integrating Polanyi and Marx in a Critical Theory of the Current Crisis, in: Brie, Michael / Thomasberger, Claus (Eds.): Karl Polanyi’s Vision of a Socialist Transformation, Montreal, New York, Chicago, London: Black Rose Books, pp. 67-76

Fraser, Nancy (2019a): The Old is Dying and the New Cannot Be Born, London/New York: Verso

Fraser, Nancy (2019b): „Die Krise der Demokratie: Über politische Widersprüche des Finanzmarktkapitalismus jenseits des Politizismus“, in: Ketterer, Hannah / Becker, Katharina (Hg.): Was stimmt nicht mit der Demokratie? Eine Debatte mit Klaus Dörre, Nancy Fraser, Stephan Lessenich und Hartmut Rosa, Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, pp. 77-99

Fraser, Nancy (2019c): “What should socialism mean in the 21st century?”, in: Panitch, Leo / Albo, Greg (Hg.): Socialist Register 2020: Beyond Market Dystopia: New Ways of Living, London: Merlin Press, pp. 282–294

Fraser, Nancy / Honneth, Axel (2003): Umverteilung oder Anerkennung? Eine politisch-philosophische Kontroverse, übersetzt von Burkhardt Wolf, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp

Fraser, Nancy / Jaeggi, Rahel (2018): Capitalism: A Conversation in Critical Theory, Cambridge/Medford: Polity

Polanyi, Karl (2001): The Great Transformation, The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, Boston: Beacon Press

Polanyi, Karl (1979): Ökonomie und Gesellschaft, übers. v. Heinrich Jelinek, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp

Translation by Jan-Peter Herrmann

Nancy Fraser

Nancy Fraser is Henry A. & Louise Loeb Professor of Political & Social Science at the New School for Social Research and the 1st Karl Polanyi visiting professor hosted by the Central European University Vienna, the University of Vienna and the WU Vienna.

Brigitte Aulenbacher

Brigitte Aulenbacher is Professor of Sociological Theory and Social Analysis at the Johannes Kepler University Linz and Vice-President of the International Karl Polanyi Society.

Degrowth and the US-Elections

US Elections 2020

"Our most fundamental need is for a habitable planet - and we’ve lost sight of it"

In order to better understand the current fight for the presidency in the US, John Hultgren and David Bond from Bennington College (Vermont, USA) talked to Gareth Dale about the importance of the Green New Deal, the need for a reduction of fossil fuels and the Degrowth movement. 

29th October, 2020

The Green New Deal and the Threat of Corporate Capture

David Bond & John Hultgren: The Green New Deal has captured the imagination of the Left in the US and beyond. After decades of playing defense, the Green New Deal advances a bold progressive vision on par with the immense need of today: a moment tipping precariously towards climate catastrophe. The Green New Deal also has the great advantage of harkening back to an immensely popular moment when government reimagined its responsibilities to the people. Drawing on Karl Polanyi’s own “ambivalences and ambiguities” about the New Deal, you advise caution on the Green New Deal. Can you explain your hesitations around the Green New Deal?

Gareth Dale: As you say, the climate catastrophe is tipping perilously. The Mauna Loa emissions graph climbs ever upwards. Radical change is urgent, and the GND is visionary. We shouldn’t see it as a definitive programme but as a “battlefield”—to use Thea Riofrancos’ term. And so too was Roosevelt’s New Deal. He didn’t enter office with a social-democratic agenda. It came thanks to movements—the hunger marches and rent strikes, the Teamster Rebellion and the waves of sit-down strikes. Those same years remind us that when organisers and movement leaders tied themselves to state institutions, their ability to mobilise went into decline. And while the New Deal did enact vital progressive reforms, and legitimated the unions, it also re-stabilised the capitalist order. It consolidated America’s grotesque, nature-trashing growth model—and then Roosevelt launched the US oil grab in the Middle East. Similar dangers face the GND today. State leaders and corporate interests are trying to own it. We saw this back in 2008 with the so-called green stimulus packages in South Korea and China. When you looked at the detail there’s virtually nothing green, it’s almost entirely greenwash and growth boosterism. The same was seen again in South Korea this year with its new GND. Within a fortnight of the announcement, the Korean government authorised a colossal bailout of Doosan Heavy Industries, one of the world’s biggest coal exporters. So any “caution” I’m voicing is against the threat of corporate capture. The movement angle of the GND, the campaigning efforts and visions of environmentalists and socialists, is inspiring—a bright light in the general murk.

“When organisers and movement leaders tied themselves to state institutions, their ability to mobilise went into decline”

David Bond & John Hultgren: Despite being quite popular and fanning the enthusiasm of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, in the current presidential campaign the Green New Deal is lambasted by both sides. Trump calls it a socialist takeover of American democracy while Biden backpedals into a less transformational, more corporate friendly, and utterly devoid of social justice version he calls “Build Back Better.” With so much at stake in 2020, why do you think now is the time to push the Green New Deal to clarify its relation to growth in particular and to the capitalist state in general?

Gareth Dale: Surely it’s always the time to clarify the relations of political projects to capital and capitalist states, for it’s they who set the economic and political framework, the rules. It’s their machine that’s steering the world to the precipice. Trump’s version is the death cult, exulting in planetary arson. Biden is a bit less repulsive, but driving a similar juggernaut. He’s currently distancing himself from the GND but if he returns, it’ll be with the aim of clipping its wings, taming it for Wall Street. So yes, in November 2020 there’s a lot at stake—and this campaign year also showcased the ability of the US electoral system to blackmail the left, with the threats that any militancy will endanger the Democrats’ prospects. So, whoever wins, organising in our communities and on the streets (…um, with masks of course…) will be more needed than ever: to push back the fascists, to keep the heat on Biden (if he wins), but also to begin to build left spaces independent from the state-supporting parties.

Fossil Fuel Reduction, Poverty Reduction & Degrowth

David Bond & John Hultgren: COVID-19 has shuttered economies around the globe and sent hundreds of millions of people worldwide into abject forms of destitution. As transportation ground to a halt and people sheltered in place, fossil fuel consumption declined significantly. You note that the sharp reductions in CO2 emissions we’ve experienced in the past 9 months must continue for decades to stave off the worst of climate change and retain some semblance of modern society. How can we continue drastic reductions of fossil fuels without also sending billions of people into poverty?

Gareth Dale: Well, billions of people already are in poverty. If we don’t drastically reduce fossil fuel use, they’ll be sent into early graves—and perhaps the human species with them—through the well-established laws of global heating and the slightly less predictable feedback loops that it’s triggering. As to how to reduce, the climate threat is so severe that drastic reductions are needed of both fossil fuel production and overall demand. So, ramp up renewables, quickly. And cut demand. Human energy consumption rose from forty terrajoules per year in 1900 to a hundred in 1950 to over five hundred today. That’s unsustainable, and can’t all be supplied by wind and waves. Obvious targets are the consumption of the super-rich, and the Pentagon—slash all that. Direct resources instead to supporting the poor, ensuring good food and shelter, and water, sanitation and electricity for all. And beyond? Well, homo sapiens is an enthrallingly needs-expanding species, but are we also a needs-comprehending species? Our most fundamental need is for a habitable planet and we’ve lost sight of it—thanks to the blinkers enforced by the capitalist system. Really, humanity should hunker down for a few hundred years. Tread lightly, to save ourselves and millions of species. This isn’t a prescription for hair shirts and self-flagellation, but resource and energy use must be clipped. You and I met at a Karl Polanyi conference. Well, in the early twentieth century Polanyi lived a happy and culturally extremely rich life, consuming a small fraction of the energy and materials that are at the command of his counterparts today. And Marx and Engels in the Communist Manifesto argued that the productive forces had reached the point at which a transition to communism could be envisaged. This was 1848. Before the invention of the car, the telephone, even the safety pin. I’m not suggesting we ‘rewind’ to that date. But for the love of life, of people and nature, present and future, a few delights of civilisation simply have to be suspended: all SUVs, all aviation (apart from dirigibles), nearly all beef (unless lab-grown), and so on.

“Our most fundamental need is for a habitable planet and we’ve lost sight of it—thanks to the blinkers enforced by the capitalist system.”

David Bond & John Hultgren: Degrowth, you have argued, is actually the most sober assessment of the current situation. Yet it struggles, as you note, to “find mass resonance.” Part of the New Deal, you suggest, contained kernels of contemporary degrowth – the government suppressed housing construction, people tore up their lawns and grew victory gardens, etc. Yet outside of the inflamed patriotism of a nation at war, it’s hard to imagine such sacrifice becoming a core commitment of party platforms let alone policies in the US. How can degrowth gain an enthusiastic base? Can we have a “homefront ecology” shorn of its nationalism?

Gareth Dale: A ’sober’ assessment of our situation is hard to reach. Can human minds really grasp the import of the climate catastrophe, the accelerating mass extinctions that their society is causing, let alone the possible end of their species itself? But yes, the degrowthers come closer than anyone else. In terms of strategy, I would put a rather different emphasis: I’d emphasise climate jobs programmes. These bring labour unionists together with environmentalists to campaign for a state-led ‘just transition,’ with secure ‘green jobs’ and care jobs and across-the-board economic change. It’s a programme that can address, and counter, two great fears of the present—mass unemployment and environmental collapse.

David Bond & John Hultgren: The poor have, in one way or another, been living a coercive form of degrowth for generations. Is there a class dimension to your theory of degrowth?

Gareth Dale: Degrowthers would say you’re completely misrepresenting their position. Their politics is all about overcoming poverty even as the materials and energy envelope reduces. And in some of my own work (The tide is rising, don’t rock the boat!), I’ve discussed how the growth paradigm, as an ideology of capitalist society, has been used historically to legitimate poverty and inequality. So yes, all of this pivots on class. The capitalist system is geared to relentless accumulation, which is spun as “growth,” which destroys nature, polarises society by class, by race, by gender and between rich and poor nations. The ownership of the world by a particular class—capitalists—who are driven by competition and the profit motive—is the root of all these evils.

“The capitalist system is geared to relentless accumulation, which is spun as “growth” and destroys nature, polarises society by class, by race, by gender and between rich and poor nations.”

David Bond & John Hultgren: The last decade has brought tremendous hope for progressive policies in the US as the neoliberal agenda is shown to be insufficient to the present challenges and actually part of the problem. In many parts of the world, the perennial logic of austerity is weakening and tax hikes on the obscenely wealthy promise a new boon to an emboldened progressive state (in the US, nationalized healthcare, free college education, and the Green New Deal). Is there a danger, in such a conjuncture, that a turn to degrowth morphs into an argument for austerity by progressive means?

Gareth Dale: Degrowthers are totally opposed to neoliberal austerity politics. A few of them do re-work the term ‘austerity’, but for very different purposes. On this, I criticise their position, you can find it in Degrowth and the Green New Deal. But it’s a small difference, perhaps only a quibble. And I hope you’re right about the tax hikes on the super-rich!

Polanyi's non-revolutionary Socialism

David Bond & John Hultgren: You argue that Polanyi “advanced a radical but non-revolutionary socialism.” Is there a contemporary party or movement that is similarly advocating for this brand of socialism? Where does BLM fit into this?

Gareth Dale: Yes, Polanyi was an anti-capitalist but didn’t understand capitalism—indeed, it wasn’t even on his theoretical compass. I think Bernie and especially Corbyn are quite close to his politics. That came with some tremendous strengths—not least of course the ability to build a sizeable socialist movement—but also weaknesses—including the tendency to collapse back into the liberal centre, and in Sanders’ case to cast votes for US imperialist adventures and projects. As to BLM, well, how much has it taught us, yet again this year! What an inspiring reminder of the capacity of popular rebellion to shake up an ossified political landscape. It has reminded us how radical politics can challenge the state ‘from without.’ Thanks to BLM, race politics in the US may have made greater strides during Trump’s tenure than any time since the 1960s. Possibly not. But even to have raised this as a possibility would’ve been laughed out of court half a year ago when politics still seemed a space strictly reserved for the state-supporting parties.

Gareth Dale

Gareth Dale is senior lecturer in politics and international relations at Brunel University, London. Before joining Brunel in 2005, he worked at Birkbeck, the LSE and Swansea University. His most recent books are Karl Polanyi: A Life on the Left and Reconstructing Karl Polanyi: Excavation and Critique, and a critique of ‘Green Growth’ (all in 2016).

David Bond

Associate Director of CAPA (Center for the Advancement of Public Action) in Bennington College, Vermont, USA

John Hultgren

Faculty of Society, Culture & Thought and Faculty of Environmental Studies, Bennington College Vermont, USA

More on the US: 

Online-Discussion with Fred Block, Margaret R. Somers, and Robert Kuttner. Organized by the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy (Montreal).
Margaret Somers on the US-Elections and beyond, interviewed by John Hultgren and David Bond. November, 2020.
Gareth Dale on Degrowth and the US-Elections, interviewed by John Hultgren and David Bond. October, 2020.
David Bond and John Hultgren on the importance of Polanyi’s work in the US. 30th of June.